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Is There Actually Increased Value in Ambulatory Surgery Centers (ASCs) that Have Certificate of Need (CON) Protection?—ASC Review

ASCs That Have CON Protection Have Higher Value—But Less Longevity.   Todd Mello, Partner and Co-founder of HealthCare Appraisers, and Nicholas Newsad, Senior Associate at HealthCare Appraisers, opine in ASC Review that many ambulatory surgical center operators perceive increased economic value for those centers with certificate of need protection, multiple practice specialties, and the participation of ort ...

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Top Ten Challenges Facing Medical Practices

The Most Critical Challenges Confronting Medical Practices Physician practices face a common set of challenges today, and Reed Tinsley explains key issues that practice owners, valuators, and financial consultants should focus on together in order to control costs, build incentives, ease management, and strengthen growth. ...

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What Data Valuators Need from Physician Practices—and Why!

Physicians Practices are Undergoing Consolidation. Most Often, Practices are Acquired by Hospitals—and a Prerequisite to Acquisition by a Hospital is Having a Practice Valuation Performed. Here’s Why. Physician practices are increasingly undergoing consolidation, and any acquisition requires a valuation performed by an independent third-party valuator. Here’s the low down on what valuators need and why they ...

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IRS: Cheapest Obamacare Plan Will Be $20,000 Per Family —IRS Report, HuffPo, Catholic News, Yahoo! Answers, Economonitor. JofA Explains Details.

Details Found in IRS Explanation Issued Wednesday; $20,000 Figure Based on a Family of Four.   In a final regulation issued Wednesday, January 30, 2013, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) assumed that under Obamacare the cheapest health insurance plan available in 2016 for a family will cost $20,000 for the year.   Under Obamacare, Americans will be required to buy health insurance or pay a penalty to the I ...

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Will “Pay for Performance Work in Healthcare?” Times Editor has Doubts. Here’s Why. —NY Times

Pay-for-Performance Provisions are a "Triumph of Theory Over Experience," Writes Bill Keller in "Carrots for Doctors."    "Pay for performance, or P4P in the jargon, is embraced by right and left. It has long been the favorite egghead prescription for our absurdly overpriced, underperforming health care system. The logic  . . .  If only it worked," writes former New York Times executive editor Bill Keller, ...

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Texas Systems Latest to Launch ACOs —Modern Physician

A Growing Willingness to Adopt a Largely Untested Payment Model Amid Increased Pressure to Curb Spending Melanie Evans at Modern Physician reports that two large Texas health systems with Medicare accountable care contracts are among the latest to enter into commercial ACOs in deals that suggest a growing willingness to adopt the largely untested payment model amid increasing pressure on providers and payer ...

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Why Concierge Medicine Will Get Bigger —CBS Marketwatch

Many Physicians Find Personalized Service is Increasingly Popular Among Patients  Elizabth O'Brien at CBS Marketwatch writes that plenty of baby boomers have done the math on so-called "concierge" medicine (also known as "boutique," "personalized" or "private physician" practices)  and deemed the investment worthy. In the typical concierge experience, a primary-care doctor accepts insurance for routine serv ...

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Six Ways Physicians Can Improve Their Public Speaking — Physicians Practice

Tips Medical Professionals Can Use to Face the Public with Confidence Sue Jacques at Physicians Practice reports:  Being a skilled medical professional doesn't necessarily mean that you're comfortable speaking in public, especially when it comes to talking to a group of peers. If the mere thought of addressing even a small audience causes your knees to knock, you're not alone. This universal anxiety is prov ...

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Health Law Pinches Colleges —Wall Street Journal

Some Schools Cut Hours of Hard-Pressed Adjuncts to Avoid Rules on Insurance Mark Peters and Douglas Belkin at the Wall Street Journal report that the federal health-care overhaul is prompting some colleges and universities to cut the hours of adjunct professors, renewing a debate about the pay and benefits of these freelance instructors who handle a significant share of teaching at U.S. higher-education ins ...

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“Health Scare for Small Businesses” — WSJ Law Blog — Growing Trend — Stories in NYT, Economist, WaPo, CNN, Forbes, US News & World Report, The Hill, & More.

Ahead of the new health-care law, small firms worry about crossing the crucial 50-person threshold — and about rising premium rates  Emily Maltby at the WSJ Law blog reports on increasing concerns about the forthcoming healthcare laws among small business owners.  This seems to be a prominent issue and concern among small business owners, and has been noted in most every major media outlet in recent weeks, ...

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Ten Tech Predictions for Medical Practices in 2013 —Physicians Practice

Enhanced Training, Meaningful Use Incentives, Patient Portals, HIEs, Mobile Apps, a Move to the Cloud, and More Yes, portals and mobile EHRs were big in 2012 — but will they continue to make headlines in 2013? And what about stuff like ICD-10 training, health information exchanges (HIEs), and telemedicine? Marissa Torreri reports that Physicians Practice asked more than a dozen healthcare IT experts, includ ...

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With New Health Law, Sharp Rise in Premiums—New York Times, 20+ Other Outlets

2013 California Filings:   Aetna: 22 percent.  Anthem Blue Cross: 26 percent.  Blue Shield of California: 20 percent. Reed Abelson at the New York Times reported last week that health insurance companies across the country are seeking and winning double-digit increases in premiums for some customers, even though one of the biggest objectives of the Obama administration’s health care law was to stem the rapi ...

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Small Business Considers How to Manage Growth, Comply With Healthcare Mandates —Wall Street Journal

Health Costs on His Mind, Small Factory Owner Looks for Ways to Cope With New Law Emily Maltby and Sarah E. Needleman at The Wall Street Journal talk with a small business owner outside of Chicago who's considering ways to manage growth, preserve profit, and comply with the new healthcare law. Automation Systems, with with sales of about $1.6 million for 2012, currently employs 40 full-time workers, mostly ...

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10 Physician Practice Trends to Watch in 2013 —Fierce Practice Management

Spotlight On Payment Reform, Alternative Care Models, and Physician Employment Agreements Debra Beaulieu at Fierce Practice Management  weighs in with Top 10 Physician Practice Trends to watch in 2013, a year that will not only be a watershed for the U.S. healthcare system, but, for many physician practices, a pivotal one professionally—where the' ability to adapt and evolve may make the difference for many ...

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CBO: New Obamacare Taxes Raise $6.9 billion in 2016; Average Tax is $1,600 —CBO, Washington Examiner

CBO Details Penalties For Being Uninsured Under The Patient Protection And Affordable Care Act The non-partisan Congressional Budget Office recently reported an estimated six million people would be subject to the Obamacare tax, approximating $7 billion in taxes in 2016 with each of the 6 million people paying at least $695. ...

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How Obama’s Re-election Will Change Medical Practice Staff —Physicians Practice

Booming Demand for Nurses and Physician Assistants;  Huge Need for Primary-Care Physicians An estimated 30 million people will gain insurance as a result of the Affordable Care Act, asserts Aubrey Westgate at Physicians Practice.   At the same time, the Association of American Medical Colleges anticipates a shortfall of 45,000 primary-care physicians and 46,000 specialists in the coming decade.   More:   “W ...

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AHA sues HHS over Medicare Payment Denials —Modern Healthcare

Federal Lawsuit from AHA and Four Other Providers Accuse HHS of Illegally Denying Medicare Payments Joe Carlson at Modern Healthcare reports the story: In a federal lawsuit, the American Hospital Association and four healthcare providers accuse HHS of illegally denying hospitals Medicare payments for audited outpatient procedures. The Chicago-based interest group for hospitals says in the complaint that HHS ...

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