How to Get Critical Client Feedback Reviewed by Momizat on . This article builds on the author’s May 11, 2022 “Being Different is More Profitable Than Being Better” article. In this article, the author provides five quest This article builds on the author’s May 11, 2022 “Being Different is More Profitable Than Being Better” article. In this article, the author provides five quest Rating: 0
You Are Here: Home » Practice Management » How to Get Critical Client Feedback

How to Get Critical Client Feedback

This article builds on the author’s May 11, 2022 “Being Different is More Profitable Than Being Better” article. In this article, the author provides five questions that my enable one to differentiate oneself from the competition.

How to Get Critical Client Feedback

How do your clients think you’re doing? You don’t know unless you ask. Because knowing what they want and then giving it to them is the easiest (if not the best) way to stand out.

This week’s topic builds on my last QR article Being Different is More Profitable Than Being Better. Towards the end of that article, there were some suggested questions we could ask clients that could help us be different than our competition. Those questions were:

  1. Why did you choose us in the first place?
  2. Why do you stay with us?
  3. What do we do that others don’t?
  4. What could we be doing for you that we currently don’t?

Of course, one way to obtain this feedback is to create an online survey. I would prefer to ask questions over coffee or a meal (now that we are doing in-person again) where you pick up the tab in exchange for the feedback.

Here are five questions to consider asking, some of which overlap the four above … so it’s not like I’m asking you to, you know, ask almost 10 questions. And ambiguous responses like “you provide good service” are not acceptable. Gently force your clients to be specific with their answers and to provide examples, where possible. You can’t do that with an online survey.

#1—How did you find me?

This is a great lead off question. It’s not too invasive or thought provoking. And it can give you insight as to which marketing channels are working for you and which ones aren’t.

#2—Why did you hire me?

This goes right to the heart of the matter, doesn’t it? You’re asking for the one thing that tipped the scale in your favor, especially for first-time clients. Hopefully, the answer isn’t “price.”

#3—Is there one thing I do better (than others you work with)?

This question might help you uncover the competitive advantage you didn’t even realize you had … something that truly differentiates your practice … and maybe translates into a tag line.

#4—Is there one thing I could do to create a better experience for you?

If you’re looking to grow/build your practice, ask about the one thing that your clients experience while working with you that you could make better/easier/simpler.

#5—Do you recommend me to others? (If so, why?)

I saved the hardest question for last. This is the litmus test of your expertise, personality, and service. Will your client risk her reputation by recommending you to someone else?

So what?

I know, I know. You dread talking to clients. But if you ask these questions, just the action of doing so might differentiate you from your competition from your client’s perspective.

So, while you are being uncomfortable, your client is thinking: Wait, you’re asking me for feedback?! About how you can improve?! You care what I think?! Holy cow, so few of the people I work with take the time. I’m gonna remember this.

And if you’re not landing as much new business as you would like via referrals, these questions might tell you where to plug the holes in your leaking dike of professional services.


Everyone has a different idea of what a successful practice is. The practice you want is personal because it is based on what “successful” means to you. I help practitioners focus on the strategies, tactics, tools, and tech to build/grow/scale their versions of successful practices. If you want some help with that, e-mail me at rod@rodburkert.com.

The National Association of Certified Valuators and Analysts (NACVA) supports the users of business and intangible asset valuation services and financial forensic services, including damages determinations of all kinds and fraud detection and prevention, by training and certifying financial professionals in these disciplines.

Number of Entries : 2362

©2022 NACVA and the Consultants' Training Institute • Toll-Free (800) 677-2009 • 1218 East 7800 South, Suite 301, Sandy, UT 84094 USA

event themes - theme rewards

Scroll to top
UA-49898941-1
lw